twerkingderp:

thebisexualfeminist:

This is so important I can’t even put it into words. 
Not all Christians are closed minded assholes.
Not all Muslims are terrorists.
Not all atheists are anti-religion jerks.

THIS

YES

twerkingderp:

thebisexualfeminist:

This is so important I can’t even put it into words. 

Not all Christians are closed minded assholes.

Not all Muslims are terrorists.

Not all atheists are anti-religion jerks.

THIS

YES

cake-stuff:

hummingbird cake
click here for recipe

..Click for more sweet desserts
thedemon-hauntedworld:

M8 Lagoon Nebula Credit: Emil Ivanov

thedemon-hauntedworld:

M8 Lagoon Nebula
Credit: Emil Ivanov

dbkglass:

Rainbow in the sky.

dbkglass:

Rainbow in the sky.

currentsinbiology:

Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics
Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. So what is the key to its’ antimicrobial properties? Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in fresh honey, from the honey stomach of bees. The bacteria produce a myriad of active antimicrobial compounds.



These lactic acid bacteria have now been tested on severe human wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), among others. When the lactic acid bacteria were applied to the pathogens in the laboratory, it counteracted all of them.
Tobias C Olofsson, Èile Butler, Pawel Markowicz, Christina Lindholm, Lennart Larsson, Alejandra Vásquez. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey’s antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12345
Working bees on honey cells (stock image). Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia

currentsinbiology:

Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics

Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. So what is the key to its’ antimicrobial properties? Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in fresh honey, from the honey stomach of bees. The bacteria produce a myriad of active antimicrobial compounds.

These lactic acid bacteria have now been tested on severe human wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), among others. When the lactic acid bacteria were applied to the pathogens in the laboratory, it counteracted all of them.

Tobias C Olofsson, Èile Butler, Pawel Markowicz, Christina Lindholm, Lennart Larsson, Alejandra Vásquez. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey’s antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12345

Working bees on honey cells (stock image). Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia

ecosapienshow:

Source - http://www.mnn.com/

urheavenlyfather:


you gotta be trippin

totally not sober.
the-stoner-sage:

weedchan:

Lobotomizer

Jess you need this omg

I want one!

the-stoner-sage:

weedchan:

Lobotomizer

Jess you need this omg

I want one!

{ x }

ruinedchildhood:

When Internet Explorer asks to be your default browser.